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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
, eisenhower worked quietly behind the scenes with the senate majority leader, lyndon johnson, to gain approval of his legislative agenda. ronald reagan developed a close relationship with the democratic speaker of the house tip o'neill, to somehow fulfill his legislative goals, compromise as they were. it might be cynical to postulate that some of nixon's rather liberal legislations forays were prompted by his desire to get along with a democratic-controlled congress. woodrow wilson was the target of republican party that wanted to even many a squabble they had with the president. he defeated both william howard taft and theodore roosevelt to win his first term. he spearheaded liberal legislation they opposed, and got approval of the league of nations that would be selected to vent republican party hostility to wilson. the treaty was never approved. the votes were there for approval, but the president allowed compromise, but wilson stood firm. it was the president, not congress, that refused to compromise. one of the most successful relationships between a president and congress occurred durin
? he said i am very familiar with the literature on second-term overreach. we both loved lyndon johnson. i don't think he ever read two words on second-term overreach. probably should have. but the point is that he is very aware of what has gone before and he knows that if you don't read all these books about previous presidents, previous leaders, really in world history, you're limiting yourself to yore own personal experience and that is pretty bad. >> is there a particular president, doris, with whom this president identifies the most or respects the most? >> well, i think when he first came into office, obviously, lincoln mattered a great deal to him. i mean, in part probably because the emancipation proclamation, the end of slavery, and he's the first african-american president, almost like closing that circle. but i think as his term went on he was reading about franklin roosevelt, teld di roosevelt. i think there's a sense when the problems change the president that you look back to changes as well. otherwise, we historians would be useful if we didn't help other know what i mean
all be better if he would drink whiskey with lawmakers as lyndon johnson did. >> yeah, far guy who is so smart it really does puzzle me. perhaps jod city or john can answer as to why he just doesn't appreciate the fact that personal relationships matter in politics at every level always have going back to lincoln. look at spielberg's film. 2013 always will. he doesn't do it terribly well, maybe that's why he wants to suggest it doesn't matter. i agree with everything that jodi just said about some of the opportunities. i do think it's worrisome and not just a parochial matter. it's worrisome that they aren't bringing more people in not just because diversity of voices and views helps but some of these people are tired. some of these people-- particularly economic people-- they are spent, charlie. i wish there were -- you had this sense there was an infusion of fresh ideas and fresh blood. not to change views and change him but just to kind of bring more vital toy the tail rather than just get ready for the big fight. senator chuck schumer has a theory to go to al's point that he te
dominated the political scene. lyndon johnson grittily be very goldwater and richard nixon, overwhelming george mcgovern. each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public and the winner had the advantage of a weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term landslide because of huge popularity. and many of our presidential elections, the candidates are in a fitted title to present themselves as the one capable of serving the country with the winner is walking off with the modern maturity. the customary wisdom that the campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president or a judgment of which candidate would be the better theater. is there really a difference between these two considerations? is it not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on effectiveness during his first term versus the unknown leadership skills of the challenger. it's easy to point to the national security or economic consequences impact on the ratings have been i
president to be sworn in by a woman? president lyndon johnson, john kennedy, bill clinton, or george w. bush? >> bill clinton? [ buzzer ] >> you're a winner too. >> yes, you are. >> all right, kim kardashian gets my book. so the correct answer here, president lyndon johnson. >> lyndon johnson. you might remember that famous, famous picture on air force one after president kennedy was assassinated. he was sworn in by a dallas judge, sarah hughes. >> okay. well, thank you so much. that was -- we learned a lot, and kathie lee is going to come back across the street now, and we're going to talk to a woman who knows a thing or two about money. our good friend suze orman is with us. we're going to speak with her after this. ♪ ng, and teaching it took to earn it. so we give you the power to keep as much of your hard-earned money as possible. our customized interview covers everything from a service member's deployment, to a student's loan interest, right down to a teacher's crayons. you've worked hard to earn your money. we're here to help you keep it. turbotax-- the power to keep what's yours. t
in the nation's capital with estimates ranging as high as 1.9 million people. until then, lyndon johnson held the record crowd of 1.2 million in 1965. attendance for president obama's second inauguration is projected to be lower than his first. president george w. bush's second inaugural in 2005 drew up to 500,000 people.>> it may be sot before we get the official estimate of the crowd here, certainly not 1.8 million who were here in 2009, but estimates before the inauguration ranged from 600,000 to 800,000 but what we can report to you is that there were a lot of americans in the national mall today who were overjoyed to witness history, inauguration of any president is a remarkable moment in american history. and they were there today, many of them with their children to see these events. the president was inaugurated of course under the -- in the shadow i probably should say, the capitol dome. a fascinating thing about the dome of the capitol, this year is the 150th anniversary of the completion of the capitol dome. something that was mentioned today during the president's inauguration. h
sarah hughes who was summoned to duty aboard air force one with lyndon johnson following a national tragedy, for the fourth time in our nation's history a woman has sworn in either the president or the vice president of the united states. i had a chance to sit down with justice sotomayor this week to talk about her historic moment. >> i was thinking just a couple of days ago if i think back of when i was a kid, which of the two events would have seemed more improbable to me. i realized each one was so far fetched that i couldn't have imagined either. >> supreme court, swearing in the vice president? >> supreme court or swearing in the vice president in front of the nation and the world. >> does it make you anxious? >> anxiety is not the word. >> and you talked to her, soledad, about how she's perceived on the bench. >> yeah. and she's considered to be very tough and she doesn't really mind or care what people have -- have that analysis of how she is on the bench. here's what she told me. >> i think the noblest profession in the world is lawyering and if a lawyer showed up who wasn't
. you could argue lyndon johnson interpreted his mandate in 1964 as a blank check in vietnam. that is one of the great dangers that confronts presidents. term curse. i think there are a number of factors. i think the word mandate should dictionary. in a polarized area, presidents have a tendency to over- interpret. -- over-interpret the mandate they have been given. host: let me add this iconic photograph of president bill clinton, hugging monica lewinsky. face impeachment. guest: we have been told by people who should know that president clinton was willing to capital he had. he won a significant, decisive victory over bob dole in 1996. he was prepared to move on entitlements, the so-called third rail of american politics, which would have required him spending a lot of political capital. then when the whole scandal broke, that was no longer a viable option. host: let me share with you this story from "the washington post." there is one sentence from this article i want you to react to. mcdonough is seen as an obama an eye on burnishing his legacy. guest: i think the press m
him, not being with him. frank church had voted against the vietnam war. lyndon johnson says the next time you want to damnen your district call frank church. can barack obama utilize the inherent power of that office? >> if he has personal relationships -- lyndon johnson had remarkable relationships. they knew when lyndon called lyndon meant business. the president needs to reach out a lot more. again, i know he's reached out, he's invited people over. we'd said a couple weeks ago he invited a lot of people over for spielberg to see "lincoln." >> state dinners. >> the majority leader's office called later and said yeah we got the invitation that afternoon, four hours beforehand. but you invite congressmen and senators over, one on one, they'll come. >> there is an upside to cooperation. not every battle is one of opposition. begin to reframe the image of the party with the rest of the country, number one. at the end of the day, that's what people want to see, you working with the administration. to joe's point, you don't have to agree with everything but
he utilize the power, the threat of power of the presidency the way lyndon johnson did with regard to resolutions during the course of the vietnam war? one senator voting against him, not being with him. frank church had voted against the vietnam war. lyndon johnson says the next time you want to damnen your district, call frank church. can barack obama utilize the inherent power of that office? >> if he has personal relationships -- lyndon johnson had remarkable relationships. they knew when lyndon called, lyndon meant business. the president needs to reach out a lot more. again, i know he's reached out, he's invited people over. we'd said a couple weeks ago he invited a lot of people over for spielberg to see "lincoln." >> state dinners. >> the majority leader's office called later and said, yeah, we got the invitation that afternoon, four hours beforehand. but you invite congressmen and senators over, one on one, they'll come. >> there is an upside to cooperation. not every battle is one of opposition. begin to reframe the image of the party with the rest of the country, number
to purge conservatives in the south from democratic primaries. you could argue lyndon johnson interpreted his mandate in 1964 as a blank check in vietnam. that is one of the great dangers that confronts presidents. i do not think there is a second term curse. i think there are a number of factors. i think the word "mandate" should be removed from the white house dictionary. in a polarized area, presidents have a tendency to over- interpret. the mandate they have been given. that is the great danger. host: let me add this iconic photograph of president bill clinton, hugging monica lewinsky. only the second president to face impeachment. guest: there will always be an element of what if with the clinton's second term. we have been told by people who should know that president clinton was willing to use some of the political capital he had. he won a significant, decisive victory over bob dole in 1996. he was prepared to move on entitlements, the so-called third rail of american politics, which would have required him spending a lot of political capital. then when the whole scandal broke, tha
lyndon johnson interpreted his mandate in 1964 as a blank check in vietnam. that is one of the great dangers that confronts presidents. i do not think there is a second term curse. i think there are a number of factors. i think the word mandate should be removed from the white house dictionary. in a polarized area, presidents have a tendency to over- interpret. host: let me add this iconic photograph of president bill clinton, hugging monica lewinsky. only the second president to face impeachment. guest: we have been told by people who should know that president clinton was willing to use some of the political capital he had. he won a significant, decisive victory over bob dole in 1996. he was prepared to move on entitlements, the so-called third rail of american politics, which would have required him spending a lot of political capital. then when the whole scandal broke, that was no longer a viable option. host: let me share with you this story from "the washington post." there is one sentence from this article i want you to react to. mcdonough is seen as an obama true believer who
. and finally, when he supports social security, medicaid and medicare, that's straight lyndon johnson, great society talk. this is a speech in the progressive tradition. at some points it's like the second inaugural of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that'
. who was the first president to be sworn in by a woman. president lyndon johnson, john kennedy, bill clinton, or george w. bush? >> bill clinton? [ buzzer ] >> you're a winner too. >> yes, you are. >> all right, kim kardashian gets my book. so the correct answer here, president lyndon johnson. >> lyndon johnson. you might remember that famous, famous picture on air force one after president kennedy was assassinated. he was sworn in by a dallas judge, sarah hughes. >> okay. well, thank you so much. that was -- we learned a lot, and kathie lee is going to come back across the street now, and we're going to talk to a woman who knows a thing or two about money. our good friend suzy or man is with us. we're going to speak with her after this. i was living with this all-over pain. a deep, throbbing, persistent ache. my doctor diagnosed it as fibromyalgia, thought to be the result of overactive nerves that cause chronic widespread pain. lyrica is believed to calm these nerves. i learned lyrica can provide significant relief from fibromyalgia pain. and for some people, it can work in as earl
in order to bring us into a new era. one of the things that lyndon johnson said famously is that when a president is elected, he's for six months he's a giraffe and thereafter a worm, so his great challenge is going to be how he figures out how to make the most of this time as a giraffe. >> let's go back outside to so sole ya vega. >> i'm here. hey, good afternoon. we made our way over from the pentagon where we were at the staging area and came over on a bus full of teenager matching band from tennessee. they were really excited and we walked our way through the mall here and made our way close to the capitol. you can see a lot of the crowd is dissipating. a lot are headed over to that paid we'll see later this afternoon. we heard all of our friends, david muir and bill weir talking about the excitement and the level of excitement you can feel just walking through this crowd. it's so palpable. one woman i just met while making my way over stopped me in my tracks during the invocation, she literally had tears streaming down her face and i said why are you so emotional? she said my gra
john f. kennedy, george h.w. bush, lyndon johnson, president jimmy carter and we'll wrap up the night at 11 eastern with george w. bush's speech. starting tonight at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> why did you write a book about your experience? >> it was an important part of history. i felt it should be brought to bear. there had been some other accounts of the crisis i thought were not completely accurate in terms of what we did and what i did. so i thought it was important for the historical record to present our perspective and for people to understand there were different policy choices and options, disagreements. and that if we want to prevent another crisis from happening again, i really felt the public itself needed to engage more on financial reform, educate themselves better. make it an issue with their elected officials. so i have some policy recommendations at the end of it that i hope people will look at. >> the former head of the deposit corporation on the government's worst financial crisis. her book is bull by the horns sunday at 8:00 on c-span's q&a. yournl continues.
tell you, brian, this is -- it's unreal to me. it is unbelievable. as lyndon johnson would say it's like history and fate coming together. for this president, this african-american, to be inaugura inaugurated for a second time on martin luther king day and can look out and see the likeness of martin luther king. to see jefferson, to see lincoln. it is just unreal. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation, almost 50 years after the march on washington, dr. king delivered the i have a dream speech, it says something about the distance we have come, the progress we have made and for him to make a speech that was so inclusive, it was about black people, white people, asian americans, latino, native americans, straight, gay, that we're one people. we're one family. we are one house. we all live in the american house. >> well, about that last point, congressman, we want to let you go and enjoy your lunch, we all do live in the same house and there you are. you have gone from the struggle earlier in your life to a warrior in the house of representatives. you have got an anxious amer
the second lowest number of murders, 85, since lyndon johnson was president. so we have control around our crime issues. but the number of bullets that are fired from a magazine is something that we want to see stopped. nobody needs more than ten bullets. gun violence, background checks, is something we need to see in cities. so these common sense reforms, you now have more than 750 mayors that are standing behind the president and the vice president. and we think we're going to get a bill. it's going to be hard, it's going to be thank you. but i think we're finally going to get major gun violence reform. >> let's talk about one topic real quick where we know there is not so much partisan politics. very important question, mayor. will the atlanta falcons go to the super bowl? >> oh, no question. we're one game away, kate. we're going. >> all right. >> the objective political analysis from the atlanta mayor there. >> mayor, great to see you. >> thank you, kate. >> thank you so much. >> rooting for the hometown. cnn. >> for the first time, the presidential -- >> atlanta falcons, best in the
johnson. that's true. >> anybody compared to bill clinton and lyndon johnson -- not going to change really in that sense. he is who he is. he doesn't want to appear to be inauthentic about it. one of the things about bill clinton was he was what i call an authentic phony. everybody believed what he was saying at the moment. barack obama always had more difficult time trying to act that up. but as he said the other day, you know, he is a nice enough guy. echoed what he said about hillary. nice enough, too. >> that line didn't go over so well the first time. >> he was talking about himself a little easier maybe. >> maybe. but do -- does he enjoy politics? >> yes. well, he enjoys politics but enjoys other things as well. you know, i -- i think that he -- he's learning how to really sort of merge that with the other aspects of what he enjoys which is policy and rest of life. >> can i say two words? joe biden. that's what joe biden is for. he does the things the president really dislikes doing. i mean, it is -- if the president doesn't like to glad hand and hang out with members of congress, th
kennedy in 1961. george w. bush in 19 99. lyndon johnson that from 1965. jimmy carter from 1977. we will wrap up with george w. bush from 2001. starting tonight at 8:00 pm on c-span. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear -- , --[no audio]>> the official swearing ceremony at the white house before noon eastern. our coverage includes your phone calls and a look back at the 2009 presidential inaugural address. the public and inaugural ceremony will be swearing in at noon eastern at the us capitol and other festivities, including the capitol luncheon and parade. live coverage begins at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. join the conversation by phone, facebook, and on twitter. >> you can see the crews finishing up work between the white house and the capitol getting ready for the inauguration. you can see in front of the white house off of the inaugural parade on monday. some of the finishing touches are going up. there is a presidential seal attached to a heated glassed in area. that is where president obama and michelle obama will watch the parade. the city of washington has spent $6.5 mil
. bush, lyndon johnson, jimmy carter, and george w. bush. >> by barack hussain obama do solemnly swear -- >> this weekend, president obama begins his second term. sunday the official swearing-in ceremony live before noon. it begins with a look back at the 2009 inaugural address at 10:30 a.m. eastern. monday, the soaring and at noon eastern at the u.s. capitol and other festivities including the capitol lunch and and the parade. all the coverage begins at 7:00 eastern time on c-span, c-span radio, and c-span.org. join the conversation by telephone, facebook, facebook.com/cspan and twitter. >> our web site will have added features including video feeds from the spin cruise, video on demand of the major events -- it c-span crews, video on demand of the major events at c-span.org. president george h. the the bush was inaugurated on to the rate 20, 1989. he was ronald reagan's vice president ford two terms. president bush was one and using the same bible as george washington. this is about 25 minutes. >> i george herbert walker bush is always where -- >> i, george herbert walker bush, do so
, lyndon b. johnson in 1963. james in brandon, florida on our republican line. good morning. caller: good morning. thank you for taking my call. i wanted to ask the country to pray for our president obama -- i am a republican, and i voted republican this year. that was to my commitment to the republican party. i am very disappointed with my party. i do not like the direction they are taking. to be honest with you, i do not like the fact that they are not cooperating in the house or any other place with democrats or with president obama. i would ask the president if he would open upper a new investigation on the 9/11 attacks on this country. i am unsatisfied with the commission report that was put out. host: that was james in brandon, florida. you can see on the capital, five large flags hanging down. the explanation of the five different flags they had hanging down -- this is a congressional report. framed against the black -- the backdrop -- the backdrop of red, white and blue -- we have at ross flag with starch -- stars are arranged in the circle. the next two flags are the flags the u.
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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